The Eureka Women's March through an Indigenous Lens

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A still from WIlbur's film. - MATIKA WILBUR
  • Matika Wilbur
  • A still from WIlbur's film.


Videographer and photographer Matika Wilbur created a short film documenting this Saturday's march. Wilbur, who is Tulalip and Swinomish, is visiting the Karuk and Hupa Nations as part of her year-long project in which she visits all 105 tribes of California. More information is available at www.project562.com.

Wilbur sent the Journal this statement:

"I've had the opportunity to stand in solidarity all over the county with indigenous women from Standing Rock to Chicago to D.C. to the desert warmth of Phoenix and I'm proud to be an era that rejects hatred and instead seeks justice - to be in Eureka among strong indigenous communities who are willing to stand up for the Earth, for equality and who came out on January 21st to show this new administration that our indigenous people will not go quietly into the wind - that treaty rights need to be upheld, sovereignty respected, and justice restored. At the end of the march the indigenous women gathered on the lawn, held hands in a circle and prayed for our communities to come together in a good way. We are seeing a new generation of Peace Makers."



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