57th Annual Klamath Salmon Festival 

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Photo by Mark Larson
Vanessa Raglin (second from left), of Fall River Mills, joined "Bigfoot" (her uncle James Kleinhans, of Klamath) and family members for a photo prior to the Ney-Puey Color Run on Saturday morning.
Photo by Mark Larson
Not all vehicles in the 10th annual Classic Car show organized by Yurok elder George Smoker and his wife, Marla, were bright and shiny. This 1940 Dodge Fargo pickup is owned by Dona Porter, of Eureka.
Photo by Mark Larson
"Bigfoot" (James Kleinhans, of Klamath) and other participants in the Ney-Puey Color Run passed another color checkpoint dose of colored powder.
Photo by Mark Larson
Runners in the Ney-Puey Color Run on Saturday morning endured multiple handfuls of colored powder during the race..
Photo by Mark Larson
Parade Grand Marshal Nellie McNeal, of Pecwan, was greeted by her granddaughter Shannon Hulbert (right) and her daughter Tyrah Sawyer, of Portland, prior to the parade.
Photo by Mark Larson
This young girl dressed in traditional handmade regalia joined the Tribal Attorney Legal Eagles parade float.
Photo by Mark Larson
The parade included this Tribal Attorney Legal Eagles parade float.
Photo by Mark Larson
The parade also featured signs advocating tribal water rights, dam removal and environmental protection.
Photo by Mark Larson
This parade marcher led chants in support of tribal water rights, dam removal and environmental protection.
Photo by Mark Larson
Denice McKenzie (foreground), of Arcata, was one of 10 weavers representing the California Indian Basketweavers' Association and multiple tribes in the Pacific Northwest doing Native American basket-weaving demonstrations.
Photo by Mark Larson
Jared Lincoln, of Klamath, was part of the group doing Native American basket-weaving demonstrations.
Photo by Mark Larson
Melanie George (left), of Hoopa, joined Alice Lincoln-Cook, of Klamath, in looking over the new exhibit of five dolls with handmade regalia made by the Klamath River Book Nook basketry class. Lincoln-Cook organized the second year of the Native American basket-weaving demonstration and displays.
Photo by Mark Larson
The traditional fire pit featured salmon steaks skewered on redwood sticks.
Photo by Mark Larson
Frank Gensaw, of Crescent City, helped his father Sam Gensawm Jr. with the traditional fire pit cooking of salmon steaks.
Photo by Mark Larson
Fresh salmon steaks skewered on redwood stakes awaited their turn to be cooked.
Photo by Mark Larson
After helping skewer fresh salmon steaks on redwood stakes, Penny Gensaw later kept busy removing cooked salmon steaks to be delivered to the lunch table.
Photo by Mark Larson
Lunch servers offered salmon steak, water and three homemade side dishes, including a green salad, chili, potato salad and a dinner roll.
Photo by Mark Larson
The traditional stick game starts when one player holdng the "tossel" drops it and the action begins. Adults provided on-field coaching of the young players and officiating the action.
Photo by Mark Larson
Players in the traditional stick game try to throw the tossel toward their team's upriver or downriver goal line.
Photo by Mark Larson
Each hand game team (the "hiding" team and the "guessing" team) had a leader, and the leader's support team members sang, drummed and attempted to distract the "guessing" team.
Photo by Mark Larson
The leader of the "hiding" hand game team distracts the "guessing" team while the leader's support team members sang and drummed.
Photo by Mark Larson
Players in the traditional stick game try to neutralize their opponents by wrestling them to the ground.
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