The 1091 

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Grant Scott-Goforth
A volunteer pulls something out of the antenna array on top of the 1091’s bridge.
Grant Scott-Goforth
The radio room is almost completely restored, and features functional Morse Code transponders and other equipment.
Grant Scott-Goforth
Don Reed takes the wheel — but adds that the bridge has been outfitted with modern engine and steering equipment.
Grant Scott-Goforth
The museum would like to get the 1091 out of the water to inspect the hull, but lacks the funds and the means. For the time being, it’s hoping to attract more visitors to the ship.
Grant Scott-Goforth
The museum owns several skiffs that it hopes to restore and use for events like races on the bay. But the 1091 remains first priority.
Grant Scott-Goforth
Looking toward mainland. Reed said the boat sometimes has issues with homeless people sleeping aboard, and the museum volunteers regularly clear trash from nearby parking lots.
Grant Scott-Goforth
Vintage oscilloscopes in the radio room.
Grant Scott-Goforth
Reed demonstrates how crew members in the engine room would communicate with the bridge through a "voice tube" — only a slight technological improvement on two cans with a string.
Grant Scott-Goforth
These life vests don't fit modern safety standards, but they add some historical color to the 1091.
Grant Scott-Goforth
Looking west from the stern of the 1091. The museum restored the winch, pictured here, which would have dropped an anchor as the boat ran ashore to discharge its troops. The boat would then use the stern anchor to pull itself back into the water. The museum sometimes uses the winch to reposition the 1091 along the dock.
Grant Scott-Goforth
The 1091 had four 50-person bunks, and infantry men were rarely let above deck as the boat island-hopped during World War II. Reed said you didn't want a top bunk — it was too cramped. But you didn't want a bottom bunk either — the chance of someone getting seasick above you was higher.
Grant Scott-Goforth
The ladder up to the empty gun tubs and bridge.
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Grant Scott-Goforth
A volunteer pulls something out of the antenna array on top of the 1091’s bridge.

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